Hello! Meet Gatsby and Scout, brother & sister Pembroke Welsh Corgis named after classic literature. They love fetch and tug, In N Out meat patties, squeaky tennis balls, and the occasional frozen yogurt. They are the best of friends.

Gatsby was born on December 10, 2011. He is AKC registered as "Fitzgerald's The Great Blue Jay." He's a happy-go-lucky ham and he loves agility. He's our little Hamkrakken.

Scout was born March 4, 2013 and is AKC registered as "Jean Louise's Lady Mockingbird." She is sassy, bossy, and every bit like her literary namesake.

PitaPata Dog tickers PitaPata Dog tickers

^ what it looks like when I try to exercise at home.

Scout is also very “helpful” in that she likes to lay directly underneath me when I’m holding a plank. And Gatsby “helps” by trying to climb up on my legs while I do lunges.

Anonymous:
Do Gatsby and Scout "baroo" often? My corgi does it ever morning! Sometimes if you talk to him he will "baroo" back and it's the funniest thing because I swear he's trying to keep up the conversation.

Gatsby is the resident baroo-er in the House of Scoutsby. Sadly, I don’t think we’ve ever heard Scout baroo. It’s funny though because I think she tries to, but it just ends up sounding like Chewbacca noises. 

Gatsby often does it when we come home from work. I like to imagine it’s him saying, “Mahm! You’re BACK!” Sometimes he’ll do it if he’s especially jazzed about meal time. Like, he’ll do it if I say to him, “Do you want to eat now?” “Aroooo-roooooo!” Other times, he’ll do it when he’s “talking” to Scout, like when they’re at a stand-off during frap sessions. Or if he wants her to chase him. 

They love going to my parents’ house because there’s a good sized yard for them to run around in. And also plants to stomp on, a Doberman next door to bark at through the fence, and birds to chase. 

It goes without saying that there are also non-stop treats at my parents’ house. (My mom is the worst. “But…they look hungry!” “No, Mom. That’s just how they look.”)

Anonymous:
Does Gatsby love to talk when you guys are running the agility course??

He does! It’s mostly talking back though. He usually does it when he’s frustrated that we have to do a sequence again, or start over again because he missed — more often than not — the weave pole entry. Or sometimes he’ll talk because I imagine he’s saying something like, “BUT I WANT TO GO ON THE DOG WALK INSTEAD” when we have tight turns on a course. 

Sometimes he’ll bark out of excitement, especially in class. “LET’S GO! LET’S GO! LET’S GO!” and he’ll usually let out a bark when we take our first obstacle at a trial. Like, “EFF YEAH LET’S DO THIS MAHM!” 

He’s quiet once we get going and we get into our groove, but yeah. He sure loves to talk back. 

Thursday, September 18, 2014
Anonymous:
I love love LOVE your blog! Your doggies always put a smile on my face! Also, just wanted to say you're really pretty :) I'm a big fan!

….Mom? Is that you?!

Really though, thank you so much! I’m glad Scoutsby make you smile. I tried to do a group selfie (a “grelfie”?) as our way of saying thanks, but they don’t feel like putting up with my shenanigans right now.

Anonymous:
I love how different Scout and Gatsby's eye shapes are. Cuties!

Indeed they are quite different. I think their faces in general are quite different. But there have been times when their facial expressions have been on point: 

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Anonymous:
How is Scout doing in agility? Is she as much of a Hamkrakken as her brofur?

She’s doing pretty well! Progress is a little slow with her compared to Gatsby, which is TOTALLY fine. I really love corgility classes with her because I think switching gears between two different dogs helps me become a better handler.

Doing agility with Scout reminds me to celebrate any kind of progress — big or small. For example: within the past 4 weeks or so, Scout has been doing the teeter completely unassisted and off leash. For the longest time before that, she wouldn’t even look at the teeter. Our goal was for her to just willingly place even just one paw on the board and honestly, I just didn’t think she would ever get comfortable with it. And then just one week, she was a complete bad ass and was like, “oh teeter? NO PROBLEM MAHM.” Like, I honestly put that on the same level as Gatsby earning his first qualifying score at a trial. She has also shown HUGE progress on the dogwalk. Just like the teeter, she actively avoided it before. She was terrified of it. But that same week, she just totally kicked butt on it…and she’s been kicking butt ever since. If I could give her a ribbon for “OMG YES YOU FINALLY DID IT”, I totally would.

She’s pretty young still — she just turned 18 months old this month — so focus is lacking sometimes (which is normal for a beginner dog). Between the two corgs, Scout is the faster one believe it or not, but in the agility ring, her confidence is still pretty low so the speed and drive aren’t quite at the same level as Gatsby’s but I really think it will improve as she gets more comfortable. And honestly, I think she’d be the more reliable one in competition. (Sshhhh, don’t tell Gatsby.)

I forgot to mention that Curry (m-coco-m) stopped by at the agility trial this weekend. Unfortunately, they didn’t get to see us run as there was about a 2.5 hour downtime between Gatsby’s runs that day. /sigh

I love when friends stop by at our trials to watch us run. :)

Sibling* swim team.

*Scout does all the swimming, Gatsby says.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Anonymous:
Do you get to decide how to run the course during agility or do they tell you??

gatsbyadventures:

I get to decide. :) That’s the beauty of agility, really. You could handle a course or a sequence a couple of different ways based on what works best for you and your dog. At trials, you get about 7-8 minutes to walk a course without your dog so you can plan on how to handle the whole thing. That way, when it’s actually time to run the course with your dog, you know where to go and it’s up to you to direct your dog around the course. In my experience, no one tells you how to run a course in agility simply because every dog-handler team is different. What works for one will not work for another. There is, of course, similarities in how people run courses but for the most part, you’ll see many different variations of how a particular course is run during a trial.

Okay, so I was rereading the question and I may have misunderstood it. WHOOPS.

Let me clarify: at trials, all the courses are designed by the judge. Each obstacle is numbered (usually with a small colored cone next to the obstacle) and each team needs to do all the obstacles in the correct order. So, yes — in some way — I guess the judge kind of indirectly “tells” you (through the course layout) how to run the course but it’s totally up to the handler to decide how to navigate the course with his/her dog.

If it helps, here’s a sample of what a course map looks like: 

Anonymous:
Do you get to decide how to run the course during agility or do they tell you??

I get to decide. :) That’s the beauty of agility, really. You could handle a course or a sequence a couple of different ways based on what works best for you and your dog. At trials, you get about 7-8 minutes to walk a course without your dog so you can plan on how to handle the whole thing. That way, when it’s actually time to run the course with your dog, you know where to go and it’s up to you to direct your dog around the course. In my experience, no one tells you how to run a course in agility simply because every dog-handler team is different. What works for one will not work for another. There is, of course, similarities in how people run courses but for the most part, you’ll see many different variations of how a particular course is run during a trial.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Gatsby - Jumpers - DASH CPE Sept 2014 from Gatsby and Scout on Vimeo.

Here’s our Level 2 Jumpers run from Saturday. This was one of my favorite courses from that day, and this was also one of our best runs that day. We Q’d and got 1st Place. Clean run, too! 

 
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